Friday, 1 April 2016

POLI 452 (POLITICS AND ECONOMIC REFORM AND DEMOCRACY IN AFRICA) INTERIM ASSESSMENT

 QUESTION (MAIN AND CITY CAMPUS) 
Select any two African countries and discuss in detail which school of thought regarding regime transitions best explains the transition to democracy in these countries, and why.


Instructions 
The IA constitute 30marks
doubled-spaced
font size-12
not more 4 pages, excluding references
submission date:15/04/19 latest 3:00pm

Friday, 4 March 2016

COURSE OUTLINE AND READING LIST - POLI 456: NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS AND DEVELOPMENT IN AFRICA



DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE

UNIVERSITY OF GHANA, LEGON

POLI 456: NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS AND DEVELOPMENT IN AFRICA
COURSE OUTLINE AND READING LIST: SECOND SEMESTER, 2015/2016

LECTURER: KWAME ASAH-ASANTE

COURSE OUTLINE AND READINGS
COURSE TITLE
NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS AND DEVELOPMENT IN AFRICA

COURSE CODE
POLI 456
PURPOSE
AND
OBJECTIVES
Since the 1980s, the continent of Africa has experienced the influx of Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs). From the protection of human rights to conflict resolution, through to the provision of aid, including that of emergency relief, NGOs have contributed immensely towards the development of the African continent.
Even such critical responsibilities of the state including the provision of basic necessities of life - potable water, security, health, etc are currently in the hands of NGOs. This obviously paints a very gloomy picture about state capacity in Africa, and the vacuum that has been so created that is being filled by NGOs. .
Though the contributions of NGOs on the continent of Africa are beyond doubt, the question that arises is: whether NGOs alone have the magic wand to turn the continent’s development around? Some have argued that it is only African states themselves who can bring about their own development and not NGOs. At best, what NGOs can offer is to play a complementary role with African states in control of their own development agenda.
It is in the light of this that this course is designed to shed light on the contributions of NGOs towards the continent’s development. While discussing the contributions by NGOs, this course will provide the various conditions prevailing in Africa that have led to the upsurge of NGOs on the continent. In addition, some of the theories underpinning NGO studies, Government-NGO relationship, among others, will be examined and discussed with the view to giving students broader perspectives on the issues under the course.

WEEK NO.
DATE
LECTURE TOPIC
TUTORIALS
VENUE
ASSESSMENT
1
01/02/16


Development Conditions in Africa


JQB R14

2
08/02/16


Development Conditions in Africa


JQB R14

3
15/02/16
The State and NGOs in Africa


JQB R14

4
22/02/16
The State and NGOs in Africa


JQB R14

5
29/02/16
Government-NGO Relationship


JQB R14

6
07/03/16
Government-NGO Relationship

JQB R14

7
14/03/16

Theoretical Issues


JQB R14

8
21/03/16

Theoretical Issues

JQB R1409&12

9
28/03/16
Group Presentation


JQB R14
Continuous Assessment
10
04/04/16

NGOs and Development in Africa


JQB R14

11
11/04/16
NGOs, International Politics and Globalization


JQB R14

12
18/04/16
NGOs, International Politics and Globalization


JQB R14

13
25/04/16
NGOs, International Politics and Globalization


JQB R14

14
REVISION
15-17
EXAMINATION

READINGS
Mazrui, A. The African Condition (London: Helnemann)

Lockwood, M. The State They’re In, 2nd Ed.  (Warwickshire: Practical Action Publishing) pp. 1-45

Edem, K.  Africa Today (Accra: University Press)

Leonard, D.K. and Straus, S.  (2003) Africa’s Stalled Development: International Causes and Cures Boulder, Colorado: Lynne Rienner pp. 1-19.
Lubeck, P. “The Crisis of African Development: Conflicting Interpretations and Resolutions” Annual Review of Sociology 18: 519-540

Brautigam, D. (1996) “State Capacity and Effective Governance” in Ndulu, B. (eds.) Agenda for Africa’s Economic Renewal (Oxford: Transaction Publishers) pp. 81-105
Adrian, L. “Bringing Politics Back In: Towards Model of the Developmental State”, The Journal of Development Studies, Vol. 31, Issue 3 (Feb 1995) pp. 400-425.
Katsriku, B. and Oquaye, M. (1996) Government and NGO Relations in Ghana Accra: Friedrich Ebert Foundation
Mkandawire, T. (2008) From Maladjusted States to Developmental States in Africa (Accra: Institute for Democratic Governance)
Clark, J.D. (2008) “NGOs and the State” in Desai, V. and Potter, R.B. (eds.) The Companion to Development Studies, 2nd Ed, (London: Hodder Education) pp. 530-533.
Stephenson, C.M. (2000) “NGOs and the Principal Organs of the United Nations” in Taylor, P. and Groom, A.J.R. (eds.) The United Nations at the Millennium: The Principal Organs (London and New York: Continuum) pp. 271-292
Lata, M. (2007) Changing Role of NGO’s in the 21st Century (New Delhi: Mahaveer and Sons), pp.1-2, 65-134.
Asante, B. (2004) World Vision International and ECOSOC Rights in Kwahu South District (1992-2002). Unpublished M. Phil Thesis (Legon: University of Ghana)
Ofori-Badu, E. (2009) Assessing Non-Governmental Organizations Contribution to Poverty Reduction in Ghana: The Case of Centre for the Development of People (CEDEP)1997-2007. Unpublished M. Phil Thesis (Legon: University of Ghana).
Salamon, L.M. (2006) “Government-Nonprofit Relations from an International Perspective” in Boris, E.T. and Steuerle,  C.E. (eds.) Nonprofit and Government: Collaboration and Conflict, 2nd Ed, (Washington D.C.: The Urban Institute Press) pp.398-430.
Puplampu, K.P. and Tettey, W.J. “State-NGO Relations in an Era of Globalisation: The Implication for Agricultural Development in Africa” Review of African Political Economy Vol. 27, No. 84 (June 2000) pp.251-272.
Lindenberg, M. and Bryant, C. (2001) Going Global Transforming Relief and Development NGOs (Bloomfield: Kumarian Press)
Edwards, M. et al. (2000) “Increasing Leverage for Development: Challenges for NGOs in a Global Future” in Lewis, D. and Wallace, T. (eds.) New Roles and Relevance: Development NGOs and the Challenge of Change (Bloomfield, Connecticut: Kumarian Press, Inc.) pp. 1-14.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:
1.      The course will last for thirteen weeks.
2.      Each class will have a two-hour lecture in addition to a one-hour tutorial per week.
3.      To ensure effective teaching and learning, lectures will be organized in an interactive manner. Students will be allowed to ask and answer questions in class.
4.      There will be an Continuous Assessment (CA) test and end of semester examination. The test will take place at the end of the 9th week. Students will be required to undertake group presentation. The CA test will carry 30 per cent of the final examination mark. The end of semester examination will carry 70 per cent. During this examination, students will be required to answer three essay questions.






COURSE OUTLINE AND READING LIST - POLI 112: POLITICAL INSTITUTIONS




DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE

UNIVERSITY OF GHANA, LEGON

POLI 112:      POLITICAL INSTITUTIONS

COURSE OUTLINE AND READING LIST: SECOND SEMESTER, 2015/2016

LECTURERS: KWAME ASAH-ASANTE, DR. SEIDU. M. ALIDU

COURSE OUTLINE AND READINGS
COURSE TITLE
POLITICAL INSTITUTIONS
COURSE CODE
POLI 112
PURPOSE
AND
OBJECTIVES
No human society can exist without rules, regulations, conventions, norms and so on. These are regulatory mechanisms that shape the conduct of people in society which constitute the basis of political institutions, and they are necessary for the administration of the state. For institutions to play the needed roles as required of them, it is important that they continue to exist for a long time. This can be achieved when people are educated about such institutions so that they will accept and internalise the knowledge. It is on the basis of this that, this course introduces beginners of the study of Political Science to the various political institutions in the state and how they function. Topics that will be considered for discussion are the concepts and theories of political institutions. Others are the legislature, executive, judiciary, political parties, electoral processes and electoral systems.

WEEK NO.
DATE
LECTURE TOPIC
TUTORIALS
VENUE
ASSESSMENT
1
1st & 3rd February 2016

The Concepts and Theories of Political Institutions

NNB1/CC

2
8th & 10th February 2016

Legislature

NNB1/CC

3
15th &17 February 2016
Legislature

NNB1/CC

4
22nd & 24th  February 2016
Executive

NNB1/CC

5
29th February & 2nd   March 2016
Executive

NNB1/CC

6
29th February & 2nd   March 2016
Judiciary

NNB1CC

7
7th & 9th March 2016
Judiciary

NNB1/CC
Continuous Assessment
8
14th & 16th March 2016
Political Parties

NNB1/CC

9
21st & 23rd
March 2016
Political Parties

NNB1/CC

10
28th & 30th March 2016
Electoral Processes

NNB1/CC

11
4th & 6th April 2016
Electoral Processes

NNB1/CC

12
11th & 13th April 2016
Electoral Systems

NNB1/CC

13
18th & 20th April 2016
Electoral Systems

NNB1/CC

14
REVISION
15-17
EXAMINATION (70%)

READINGS
1.      Asah-Asante, K. & Brako, I. (2015). Understanding Political Institutions. (Accra: Black Mask Ltd.).
2.      Hague, R. & Harrop, M. (2010). Comparative Government and Politics: An Introduction, 8th ed. (New York: Palgrave Macmillan).
3.      Heywood, A. (2007). Politics, 3rd ed. (New York: Palgrave Macmillan).
4.      Guy Peters, B. (2005). Institutional Theory in Political Science: The New Institutionalism, 2nd ed. (London: Continuum).
5.      Magstadt, T. M. (2006). Understanding Politics: Ideas, Institutions and Issues. (Wadsworth Cengage Learning).
6.      Miller, R. L. (1999). NTC’s American Government, 2nd ed. (Lincolnwood: National Textbook Co.).

       COURSE REQUIREMENTS:
1.      The course will last for thirteen weeks.
2.      Each class will have a two-hour lecture in addition to a one-hour tutorial per week.
3.      To ensure effective teaching and learning, lectures will be organized in an interactive manner. Students will be allowed to ask and answer questions in class.
4.      There will be a Continuous Assessment (CA) test and end of semester examination. The test will take the form of an assignment. The CA test will carry 30 per cent of the final examination mark. The end of semester examination will carry 70 per cent. During this examination, students will be required to answer some multiple choice, short response and essay questions.