Friday, 12 September 2014

COURSE OUTLINE AND READING LIST FOR POLI 441: POLITICAL ECONOMY OF AFRICA'S DEVELOPMENT SINCE INDEPENDENCE

DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE
University of Ghana
POLI 441: The Political Economy of Africa’s Development since Independence

Course Outline and Reading List
First Semester 2014/2015 

Lecturers: Dr. S. M. Alidu/Mr. K. Jonah               Contact: skkytosh@yahoo.com
Time and Venue:       Wednesday’s 7:30 – 9:20 (Group A) JQB 23                                      
                                     Friday’s 9:30 – 11:20 (Group B) CC

This course introduces students to the interaction between politics and economics and its implication for Africa’s development.  It will examine both domestic and international forces that influence Africa’s development since independence, the continent’s response to these developmental challenges and the contending theories that shaped those responses. It is expected that students will be able to identify and discuss the different theories that underpin the International Political Economy and apply them to the various developmental challenges of Africa and other parts of the world in similar circumstances.

TOPICS:
Development Strategy in Historical Perspectives
  • Chang, H.-J. (2005) Kicking Away the Ladder: Developing Strategy in Historical Perspective, London: Anthem Press (Chapter 1, “Introduction: How did the Rich Countries Really Rich?,” pp. 1 – 9)
  • Wade, R. H. (2003) Governing the Market: Economic Theory and the role of Government in East Asia’s Industrialization, Princeton: Princeton University Press (“Introduction”)
  • Bardhan, P. (1993) “Symposium on Democracy and Development” Journal of Economic Perspectives, Vol. 7, No. 3, pp. 45-49
  • Nye, J. (1991) “The Myth of Free-Trade Britain and Fortress France: Tariffs and Trade in the Nineteenth Century” Journal of Economic History, Vol. 53, No.1, pp. 23-46
The Political Economy Framework
  • DfID (2009) Political Economy Analysis:  How to Note. A DfID Practice Paper, July
  • Hickey, S. (2007) Conceptualizing the Politics of Social Protection in Africa. BWPI Working Paper 4, October
  • Whitfield, L. (2011) Competitive Clientelism, Easy Financing and Weak Capitalist: the Contemporary Political Settlements in Ghana. DIIS Working Paper 27
Theoretical Approaches and Contending Perspectives in IPE
  • Ravenhill, J. (ed) (2005) Global Political Economy, Oxford: Oxford University Press, (Part One, pp. 3 – 47)
  • O’Brien, R. and Williams, M. (2004) Global Political Economy: Evolution and Dynamics, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, (Chp. 1, Understanding the Global Political Economy, pp. 11 – 36)
  • Jackson, R.  and Sorensen, G. (2003) Introduction to International Relations Theories and Approaches, Oxford: Oxford University Press (Chp. 6, International Political Economy Theories (IPE): Classical Theories, pp. 175 – 193;  Chp. 8, International Political Economy: Contemporary Debates).
  • Oatley, T. (2008) International Political Economy: Interests and Institutions in the Global Economy, Third Edition, New York: Pearson Education, Inc. (Chp. 1: International Political Economy, pp. 2 – 21)

Aid and Africa’s Development   
  • Dambisa, M. (2009) Dead Aid: Why Aid is not Working and How there is a Better Way for Africa. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, (Part I: The World of Aid, pp. 3 – 68)
  • World Bank (2000) Can Africa Claim the 21st Century? Washington DC: World Bank (Chp. 8: “Reducing Aid Dependence and Debt and Strengthening Partnerships”, pp. 235 – 255)
  • World Bank (2002) A Case for Aid: Building a Consensus for Development Assistance, Washington DC: World Bank (Part II: Nicholas Stern “Making the Case for Aid” pp.  15 – 24)
  • Neumayer, E. (2003) The Pattern of Aid Giving: the Impact of Good Governance on Development Assistance, London: Routledge
  •  Arslanalp, Serkan and Peter Blair Henry (2004) “Helping the Poor Help Themselves: Debt Relief or Aid?”, NBER Working Paper N0. 10230, January

Globalization and Africa’s Development  
  •  Wolf, M.  (2004) Why Globalization Works, New Haven: Yale University Press (Chp. 2, What Liberal Globalization Means, pp. 13 – 22; Chp.7, Globalization in the Long Run, pp. 96 – 105)   
  • Stiglitz, J. E.  (2002)  Globalization and its Discontents, New York: W.W. Norton and Company (Chp. 9, The Way Ahead, pp. 214 – 252)
  • Wade, R. (2005) “Globalization, Poverty and Inequality” in Ravenhill, J. (ed)   Global Political Economy, Oxford: Oxford University Press
  • Boafo-Arthur, K. (2003) “Tackling Africa’s Developmental Dilemmas: Is Globalization the Answer?” Journal of Third World Studies, Vol. XX, No. 1, Spring, pp. 27 – 54

Responses to Africa’s Economic Quandary
  • Callaghy, T.M. and Ravenhill, J.  (eds.) (1993) Hemmed In: Responses to Africa’s Economic Decline, New York: Columbia University Press (Introduction “Vision, Politics and Structure: Afro-Optimism, Afro-Pessimism, or Reality”)
  • Chang, H. (2005) Kicking Away the Ladder: Development Strategy in Historical Perspective, London: Anthem Press (Chp. 3, Institutions and Economic Development: “Good Governance” in Historical Perspective, pp. 69 – 110) 
  • Sen, A.  (1999) Development as Freedom, Oxford: Oxford University Press, (Chp. 1, The Perspective of Freedom, pp. 13 – 34; Chp. 2, The Ends and Means of Development, pp.  35 – 53)   
  • The New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD) (www.nepad.org.)


Thursday, 11 September 2014

COURSE OUTLINE AND READING LIST FOR POLI 111: INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF POLITICAL SCIENCE

DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE
UNIVERSITY OF GHANA, LEGON

POLI 111:      INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF POLITICAL SCIENCE

COURSE OUTLINE AND READING LIST: FIRST SEMESTER, 2014/2015

LECTURERS:
MR. KWESI JONAH                                   email: kwesijonah@gmail.com
DR. EVANS AGGREY-DARKOH              email: aggreydarkoh@ug.edu.gh
DR. SEIDU MAHAMA ALIDU                  email: smalidu@ug.edu.gh

COURSE OUTLINE AND READINGS
COURSE TITLE
INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF POLITICAL SCIENCE
COURSE CODE
POLI 111
PURPOSE
AND
OBJECTIVES
Like any other human endeavour, the laying of a solid foundation in academic pursuit is crucial for the appreciation and understanding of the discipline. For this to be achieved, it is always important for beginners to get the basics right before building upon it subsequently. This explains why this course, Introduction to the Study of Political Science, is offered, particularly at this level, to introduce students to some basic ideas and concepts in the field of Political Science. Apart from the nature and scope of the subject matter of politics, the course will focus on traditional political concepts like nation, state, power, influence, authority and sovereignty. Other concepts to be considered include government, democracy and good governance due to their relevance in modern societies. The successful completion and understanding of this course are necessary for the preparation of students for a future in-depth study of other Political Science courses.
WEEK NO.
DATE
LECTURE TOPIC
TUTORIALS
VENUE
ASSESSMENT
1

Nature and Scope of Politics

JQB 09, 14 & 24

2

Nature and Scope of Politics

JQB 09, 14 & 24

3

Nature and Scope of Political Science

JQB 09, 14 & 24

4

Nature and Scope of Political Science

JQB 09, 14 & 24

5

The Concepts of Power, Authority and Influence

JQB 09, 14 & 24

6

The Concepts of Legitimacy and Sovereignty

JQB 09, 14 & 24

7

The Concepts of Legitimacy and Sovereignty

JQB 09, 14 & 24
Continuous Assessment
8

Ideology

JQB 09, 14 & 24

9

Ideology

JQB 09, 14 & 24

10

Government

JQB 09, 14 & 24

11

Government

JQB 09, 14 & 24

12

Democracy and Good Governance

JQB 09, 14 & 24

13

Democracy and Good Governance

JQB 09, 14 & 24

14
REVISION
15-17
EXAMINATION (70%)

READINGS
  • Heywood, A. Politics, 3ed. (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007)
  • Roskin et al. Political Science: An Introduction, 4ed. (New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, 1991)
  • Bealey, F., et al. Elements in Political Science (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1999)
  • Magstadt, T.M. and Schotten, P.M. Understanding Politics: Ideas, Institutions and Issues, 4ed. (New York: St Martin’s Press, 1996)
  • Jackson, R.J. and Jackson, D. (eds.). An Introduction to Political Science: Comparative and World Politics, 4ed. (Toronto: Prentice-Hall, 2003)
  • Easton, D. The Political System (New York: A Knopf, 1965)
  • Nnoli, O. Introduction to Politics (Singapore: Longman Singapore Publishers Pte Ltd., 1986)
  • Bluwey, G.K. Political Science: An Introduction (Accra: Yamens Press Ltd., 2002)
  • Hague et al. Political Science: A Comparative Introduction (New York: St. Martin’s, 1992)
  • Godwin, K.R. and Wahlke, J. Introduction to Political Science: Reasons, Reflections and Analysis (New York: Harcourt Brace, 1997)
  • Appadorai, A. The Substance of Politics (India: Oxford University Press, 1968)
  • Skidmore, M. J. Ideologies: Politics in Action (Philadelphia: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1993)
  • Oakeshott, M. et al. Ideologies of Politics (Cape Town: Oxford University Press, 1975)
  • Dahl, R.A. Democracy and Its Critics (New Haven, C.T.: Yale University Press, 1989)
  • Good Governance and sustainable human development. Available at F:\ Good governance – and sustainable human development – UNDP accessed on 09/07/07
  • Governance: Sound Development Management. Available at F:\Governance Sound Development Management - Good Governance defined- ADB_org.htm.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:
  • The course will last for thirteen weeks. 
  • Each class will have a two-hour lecture in addition to a one-hour tutorial per week.
  • To ensure effective teaching and learning, lectures will be organized in an interactive manner.   Students will be allowed to ask and answer questions in class.
  • There will be a Continuous Assessment (CA) test and end of semester examination. The test will take place at the end of the Seventh week. Students will be required to answer only one essay question. The CA test will carry 30 per cent of the final examination mark. The end of semester examination will carry 70 per cent. During this examination, students will be required to answer three essay questions.