Friday, 20 April 2018

COURSE OUTLINE AND READING LIST FOR POLI 112: POLITICAL INSTITUTIONS 2018



DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE
UNIVERSITY OF GHANA, LEGON
POLI 112: POLITICAL INSTITUTIONS
COURSE OUTLINE AND READING LIST: SECOND SEMESTER, 2017/2018
LECTURERS: DR. KWAME ASAH-ASANTE, DR. ROSINA FOLI  

COURSE OUTLINE AND READINGS
COURSE TITLE
POLITICAL INSTITUTIONS
COURSE CODE
POLI 112
PURPOSE
AND
OBJECTIVES
No human society can exist without rules, regulations, conventions, norms and so on. These are regulatory mechanisms that shape the conduct of people in society which constitute the basis of political institutions, and they are necessary for the administration of the state. For institutions to play the needed roles as required of them, it is important that they continue to exist for a long time. This can be achieved when people are educated about such institutions so that they will accept and internalise the knowledge. It is on the basis of this that, this course introduces beginners of the study of Political Science to the various political institutions in the state and how they function. Topics that will be considered for discussion are the concepts and theories of political institutions. Others are the legislature, executive, judiciary, political parties, electoral processes and electoral systems.
WEEK NO.
DATE
LECTURE TOPIC
TUTORIALS
VENUE
ASSESSMENT
1
February 5, 9, 2018

The Concepts and Theories of Political Institutions

NNB2/JQB22/CC

2
February 12, 16, 2018
Legislature

NNB2/JQB22/CC

3
February  19, 23 2018
Legislature

NNB2/JQB22/CC

4
February 26 and March 2, 2018
Executive

NNB2/JQB22/CC

5
March 5, 9,  2018
Executive

NNB2/JQB22/CC

6
March 12, 16, 2018
Judiciary

NNB2/JQB22/CC

7
March 19, 23, 2018
Judiciary

NNB2/JQB22/CC
Continuous Assessment
8
March 26, 30 2018
Separation of Powers/ Checks and Balance

NNB2/JQB22/CC

9
April 2, 6, 2018
Political Parties/
Electoral Process

NNB2/JQB22/CC

RKF
10
April 9, 13, 2018
Political Parties/
Electoral Process  

NNB2/JQB22/CC
RKF
11
April 16, 20, 2018
Electoral Systems

NNB2/JQB22/CC
RKF
12
April 17, 21, 2018
Constitution

NNB1/JQB22/CC

13
April 23, 27, 2018
Constitution

NNB2/JQB22/CC

14
REVISION
15-17
EXAMINATION (70%)

READINGS
1.      Asah-Asante, K. & Brako, I. (2015). Understanding Political Institutions. (Accra: Black Mask Ltd.).
2.      Hague, R. & Harrop, M. (2010). Comparative Government and Politics: An Introduction, 8th ed. (New York: Palgrave Macmillan).
3.      Heywood, A. (2007). Politics, 3rd ed. (New York: Palgrave Macmillan).
4.      Guy Peters, B. (2005). Institutional Theory in Political Science: The New Institutionalism, 2nd ed. (London: Continuum).
5.      Magstadt, T. M. (2006). Understanding Politics: Ideas, Institutions and Issues. (Wadsworth Cengage Learning).
6.      Miller, R. L. (1999). NTC’s American Government, 2nd ed. (Lincolnwood: National Textbook Co.).
COURSE REQUIREMENTS:
1.      The course will last for thirteen weeks.
2.      Each class will have a two-hour lecture in addition to a one-hour tutorial per week.
3.      To ensure effective teaching and learning, lectures will be organized in an interactive manner. Students will be allowed to ask and answer questions in class.
4.      There will be a Continuous Assessment (CA) test and end of semester examination. The CA test will take place at the Seventh Week. The CA test will carry 30 per cent of the final examination mark. The end of semester examination will carry 70 per cent. During this examination, students will be required to answer some multiple choice, short response and essay questions.
ALLOCATION OF EXAMINATION MARKS
Continuous Assessment                                  30%
Main Examination                                           70%
Total Marks                                                     100%                                                                                                 

Thursday, 29 March 2018

POLI 358: CONFLICT AND SOCIETY IN AFRICA COURSE OUTLINE AND READING LIST FOR 2017/2018 ACADEMIC YEAR



Title of Course: CONFLICT AND SOCIETY IN AFRICA
Course Code: POLI 358
Credits: 3
Course Instructor: Seidu Alidu, PhD
Office: Political Science Dep’t, No. 12
Email: seidualidu@gmail.com
Office Hours: Fridays 10-1:00am
PREAMBLE (AIM AND OBJECTIVE I.E., JUSTIFICATION)
Conflicts provide the friction in life that help us to move on. Depending on how the conflict energy is expressed, the outcome of conflicts could be positive for general society growth, contrary to the popular perception that conflicts are bad. The African continent has a notorious record of being the hot bed of conflicts in the world, especially those that are identity based and overly protracted. In this course we are generally going to explore the generic model, unified theories and individual explanations to the causes of these conflicts; the energy they feed on and the manner that they could be dealt it. We shall also explore the processes as well as communal and state levels strategies that are employed in response. Finally we shall analyze the outcomes of these conflicts and its effects on vulnerable groups such as women and children as well the entire society.
COURSE CONTENT
The course begins with the nature and evolution of conflicts in Africa, the theoretical assumptions and contending perspectives that underpin these dynamics. From these generic levels, the course will move to deal with narrowly specific topics such as the role of gender, religion and culture in societal based conflicts in Africa. It will end with the examination of mechanisms that are employed to deal with conflicts and restore the moral fabric that are destroyed when societies fight. It will specifically look at both restorative and retributive mechanisms as well as the role of leadership and governance in Africa in the prevention, managing and the resolution of these conflicts.
LEARNING OUTCOMES
At the end of the course students should be able to understand the nature and dynamics of conflicts; appreciate the theoretical assumptions that underpin them; analyze the causes of conflicts using both generic models and specific explanations; and finally, students should be able to predict the outcomes and proffer solutions to conflicts. Main learning approach will be:
·Interactive lectures
·Use of Case studies
·Use of tutorial sessions discussing published literature.


Plagiarism and Cheating       
Plagiarism, which is representing somebody’s work as your own, as well as cheating in all forms, must be avoided. The consequences of these behaviors are not worth mentioning in this class. Check University of Handbook for details.
REQUIRED READING
·Barash, D.P. and Webel, C.P. (eds.) (2009) Peace and Conflict Studies, 2nd edition, Thousand Oaks, California, Sage publication
·Williams, P. W. (ed.) (2008) Security Studies: An Introduction, Oxon: Routledge
·Avruch, K. (1999) Culture and Conflict Resolution Washington, USIP Press
·Woodhouse, T. and Duffey, T. (2000) Peacekeeping and International Conflict Resolution, New York: UNITAR-POCI
·Lederach, J. P. (1997) Building Peace: Sustainable Reconciliation in Divided Societies, Washington DC: USIP Press
·Lederach, J. P. (1995) Preparing for Peace: Conflict Transformation across Cultures, New York: Syracuse University Press
·Bassiouni, M.C. (2002) (ed.) Post-Conflict Justice, New York: Transnational Press Inc.
·Miall, H. Ramsbotham, O. and Woodhouse, T. (2001) Contemporary Conflict
Resolution, Cambridge: Polity Press
·Zartman, William (ed.) Governance as Conflict Management: Politics and Violence in West Africa. Washington DC: Brookings Institution Press
DETAILED WEEKLY SYNOPSIS
Week
Topics to be Taught
Learning Outcomes
Preparations/readings
Discussions and Follow-up activities
1
Nature and Evolution
of Conflicts in African
Societies
-To explain the
nature of African
conflicts
-To understand
the diversity of
Conflicts in
Africa

Mazrui(2008): pp. 36-50:
Williams
(2011); pp. 13-35;
Ramsbotham, et, al
(2011):pp. 94-122;
Manuh and Sutherland
-Addy (2013) Chapter7,  pp. 151
-164

State vs. non-state based conflicts: positions vs. interest in conflict; positive vs. negative conflict energy; Galtung’s conflict triangle.

2
Nature and Evolution of Conflicts in African Societies II

To comprehend the nature and diversity of African societies  To appreciate the causes of conflicts of Africa based on the diversity above

Mazrui(2008): pp.36-50: Williams (2011); pp. 13-35; Ramsbotham, et, al (2011):pp. 94-122; Manuh and Sutherland-Addy (2013) Chapter 7, pp. 151-164

Nature of African society; the African worldview of conflict; negative vs. positive peace; structural, cultural and direct violence; levels of societal violence

3
Theoretical assumptions and contending perspectives of Conflicts in Africa I

-To understand the theoretical foundation of conflicts in Africa
-To appreciate the context and assumptions governing the causes of African conflicts

Ramsbotham, et, al (2011):pp. 94-122;
Woodhouse and Duffy, Chapter 1 “Introduction to Conflict Resolution” pp.5 – 22; Chapter 3 “Understanding Contemporary Conflicts” pp.65 – 91
Edward Azar’s Protracted Social Conflict Theory; the Greed and Grievance Theory; the Interpretative Framework for Conflict Analysis

4
Theoretical assumptions and contending perspectives of Conflicts in Africa II

-To understand and use data in the analysis of conflicts
-To help students support theoretical explanations with data;
  

Ramsbotham, et, al (2011):pp. 94-122;
Woodhouse and Duffy, Chapter 1 “Introduction to Conflict Resolution” pp.5 – 22; Chapter 3 “Understanding Contemporary Conflicts” pp.65 – 91

The Political Instability Taskforce Explanation; the Monty Marshall’s Explanation; the Uppsala Conflict data analysis; SIPRI data analysis

5
Gender and Conflicts in Africa I

-To explain how conflict affect the sexes differently
-To demonstrate the role women in African conflicts

Bannon, I., Tsjeard, B., & Frerks, G. (2004); DeLaat, J. (1999); Mann, L. (October 1994).

The distinction between sex and gender; women as victims and perpetrators of war; rape as a weapon of war; the gendered role in conflict resolution

6
Gender and Conflicts in Africa II

-To show the effects and impact of conflicts on women
-To understand the contribution of women in conflict resolution outcomes

Bannon, I., Tsjeard, B., & Frerks, G. (2004); DeLaat, J. (1999); Mann, L. (October 1994).

The distinction between sex and gender; women as victims and perpetrators of war; rape as a weapon of war; the gendered role in conflict resolution

7
Culture, Religion and Africa Conflicts I

-To appreciate the varieties of religions and culture that exists in the continent
-To explain the role of culture and religion as causes of conflicts

Avruch, K. and Black, P Avruch, K. Black, P. and Joseph, A.S. (2009). (1991); Lederach, J. P. (1995); Avruch, K. (1999)

Universal vs. cultural relative conflict practices; etic vs.emic conceptions of conflict; ethnopraxe vs. ethnoconflict assumptions;

9
Culture, Religion and Africa Conflicts II

-To appreciate the role of religion and culture as conflict resolution mechanisms
-To appreciate the various traditional and cultural conflict resolution mechanisms that exist

Avruch, K. and Black, P Avruch, K. Black, P. and Joseph, A.S. (2009). (1991); Lederach, J. P. (1995); Avruch, K. (1999)

Traditional and cultural reconciliation mechanisms: mato oput ceremony, gacaca courts, burning of arrows etc.

10
Reconciliation and building cohesive societies after conflicts I

-To appreciate the different modes of healing and reconciliation after conflicts;
-To understand the importance of societal healing and how to achieve it

Lederach, J. P (1997); Lederach, J. P. (1999); Bassiouni, M.C. (2002); Minow, M. (1998)

Restorative vs. Retributive justice mechanism; the hybrid system; ad-hoc tribunals; national justice systems; Truth and Reconciliation Commissions; Traditional justice healing mechanisms

11
Reconciliation and building cohesive societies after conflicts II

-To appreciate the different modes of healing and reconciliation after conflicts;
-To understand the importance of societal healing and how to achieve it


Lederach, J. P (1997); Lederach, J. P. (1999); Bassiouni, M.C. (2002); Minow, M. (1998)

Restorative vs. Retributive justice mechanism; the hybrid system; ad-hoc tribunals; national justice systems; Truth and Reconciliation Commissions; Traditional justice healing mechanisms

12
Governance and Leadership in African conflict resolution I

-To appreciate the role of governance structures in the start and resolution of conflicts
-To understand the critical role of leadership in conflict resolution

Ramsbotham, et, al (2011):pp. 94-122;
Woodhouse and Duffy, Chapter 1 “Introduction to Conflict Resolution” pp.5 – 22; Chapter 3 “Understanding Contemporary Conflicts” pp.65 – 91
Leadership skills and styles; Leadership and public policy making; Governance vs. Good governance: Conditions and benchmarks for good governance.

13
Governance and Leadership in African conflict resolution II


Ramsbotham, et, al (2011):pp. 94-122;
Woodhouse and Duffy, Chapter 1 “Introduction to Conflict Resolution” pp.5 – 22; Chapter 3 “Understanding Contemporary Conflicts” pp.65 – 91
Leadership skills and styles; Leadership and public policy making; Governance vs. Good governance: Conditions and benchmarks for good governance.