Tuesday, 22 August 2017

COURSE OUTLINE AND READING LISTS - POLI 445:POLITICS OF INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC RELATIONS






















Department of Political Science, University of Ghana                                      Instructor:  Bossman E. Asare (Office of HOD) bossasare@gmail.com/ beasare@ug.edu.gh


COURSE TITLE : POLITICS OF INTERNATIONAL ECEONOMIC RELATIONS

COURSE CODE : POLI 445

Purpose and Objectives
This course offers an introduction to the political and economic relations among countries and international organizations in the global system.  Within the broader family of international relations, international political economy (IPE), or politics of international economic relations, is primarily concerned with the interactions between political actors and economic forces in the global system. Scholars in the field of international political economy have divided it into several parts, including the international trade system, theories that explain economic relations, globalization, multinational corporations, economic development, the international monetary system, etc. The class is intended to help students appreciate how each division (though they all tend to work in tandem in the global economy), shapes global economic relations.  The course also renders some investigative frameworks: Why global north countries dominate trade politics? What explain/s the marginal role played by global south countries in the international economy? The role of multinational corporations in the developing world; The contents and discontents of globalization; How regionalism could leapfrog the economies of the global south? The role of non-state actors in the global economy; and among others.
By the end of the class, students will understand how political actors shape the global economy; the theories that explain the role of both rich and poor countries in the global economy; why Africa has less influence on the global economy; the international institutions that shape the economic policies of global south countries; why regionalism has not achieved the desired results in Africa; Statist and Societal explanations of trade policies; and the controversies surrounding globalization. Each student must come to class ready to discuss the assigned readings in a more coherent fashion. All the assigned readings are meant to be read and discussed. Note that students who read regularly tend to do substantially better than others who do not read regularly.
Reading Materials
Thomas Oatley (2013), International Political Economy (fifth Edition): Interests and Institutions in the Global Economy, Pearson Longman.
Bossman E. Asare (2016). International Politics: The Beginner’s Guide- Updated and Expanded, Digibooks, Ghana.
Charles W. Kegley Jr. and Shannon L. Blanton (2010). World Politics: Trend and Transformation, Wadsworth: Cengage Learning, USA.
Robert Gilpin (2000). The Challenge of Global Capitalism: The World Economy in the 21st Century, Princeton
Richard Payne (2007). Global Issues: Politics, Economics, and Culture. New York: Pearson Longman.   
John Ravenhill (Editor) (2005). Global Political Economy. Oxford University Press.
Joseph Stiglitz (2003). Globalization and its Discontents. Norton, USA.
Martin Wolf (2001). Will the Nation-State Survive Globalization? Foreign Affairs
Joshua Golstein and Jon Pevehouse (2006). International Relations, Pearson Longman, USA.                                                                                                                                                                               
Exams
Final exams will consist of a combination of fill in the blanks, short essays, and long essay questions. The final is cumulative, with questions ranging from the first day to the last day of class. The Interim Assessment (20 %) will involve fill-in-the-blanks and short essay questions. The IA will focus on certain areas. The date for the IA will be announced in class.
Term Reflective Paper
Each student should respond to the question below in 1000-1200 words long, 12-point font, and double-spacing:  examine the claim that ‘globalization is a panacea to the economic development of countries in the global south.’ The paper (10%) is due on the fourth week at class time.
Civility
Civility in the classroom is expected of all students. Students who disrupt class to the extent that other’s educational opportunities are diminished may be asked to leave the classroom. Cell phones must be turned off at all times in the classroom.
Communicating with your Instructor
 Feel free to stop by and discuss academic matters or concerns with me in the office. All emails sent to me should include POLI 445 in the subject line.
Class Attendance and Participation
Attendance will be monitored every class session, and students are expected to regularly and relevantly contribute to class discussions by raising questions and making salient comments. For the purpose of class participation, which is compulsory, students are encouraged to talk about their experiences at their places of Attachments and Internships and what they have heard/seen relating to human resource management. This will be an opportunity for students to make oral contributions, in addition to the regular lectures and discussions. Importantly, be aware that students who attend class regularly tend to perform substantially better than students who skip regularly.
Learning Disability Students
Any student with an officially recognized disability should make fitting arrangements with the university, not the instructor.
Plagiarism and Cheating
Plagiarism, which is representing somebody’s work as your own, as well as cheating in all forms, must be avoided. The consequences of these behaviors are not worth mentioning in this class.

Week No.
Date
Lecture Course
Tutorials
Venue
Assessment/Readings
1

Introduction to course and explanation of key terms and key themes in Politics of International Economic Relations

Lecture:  JQB 09
Oatley chapter 1 and Gilpin read introduction
2

Theories of International Political Economy
One hour-week one lectures
Lecture:  JQB 09
Oatley chapter 1  
3

Intergovernmental Organizations and the Global Political Economy-The World Trade Organization and the World Trade System, The World Bank and European Regional Integration
Week 2 lecture discussions
Lecture:  JQB 09
Asare  chapter 5, Oatley Chapter 2, Gilpin chapter 7
4

Continue from week 3
Weeks 3 /4 lectures discussions and questions
Lecture:  JQB 09
Asare  chapter 5, Oatley Chapter 2, Gilpin chapter 7
5

Import-Substitution Industrialization
Role of ISI’s in development
Lecture:  JQB 09
Oatley Chapter 6
6

A Society-Centered Approach to Trade Politics
Discuss the role of interest groups
Lecture:  JQB 09
Oatley Chapter 4
7

A State-Centered Approach to Trade Politics
Statists explanation for economic development
Lecture:  JQB 09
Oatley Chapter 5
8

Multinational Corporations in the Global Economy
A discussion of the role of MNCs in the developing
Lecture:  JQB 09
 Asare Chapter 8, Oatley Chapters 8 & 9, Gilpin chapter 8
9

Globalization and international trade
The discontents and contents of globalization
Lecture:  JQB 09

Asare chapter 9, Kegley chapters 9 & 10, Payne chapters 1, 6, 10 &11, Gilpin chapter 10
10

Continue
Continue
Lecture:  JQB 09
Continue
11

Terrorism and the global economy
Militant activities and the global economy 
Lecture:  JQB 09
Asare chapter 7                         Cindy Combs (2011, 6th edition) Terrorism in the Twenty-First Century
12

Regional Integration African Regionalism
The role of integration in Africa’s development
 JQB 09
Joshua Golstein and Jon Pevehouse chapter 10, Gilpin chapter 9, Asare chapter 5, Kegley chapters 6 and 14      
13

Class discussions on Africa in the Global Political Economy and Revision
Revision
Lecture:  JQB 09

14 - 16
Final Exam (70%)
                                                      


Monday, 13 February 2017

COURSE OUTLINE AND READING LISTS - POLI 344: METHODS OF POLITICAL RESEARCH



University of Ghana
                     Department of Political Science
           Second Semester, 2016/2017 Academic Year
                Lecturer: Dr. Isaac Owusu-Mensah
Course Title
Methods of Political Research
Course Code
POLI 344
Purpose and Objectives
The course is intended to introduce students to research process in social science. The purpose of this course is to give students a firm grounding in the fundamentals of political research and to familiarize students with a range of typical data collection and analysis methods and processes in political science. Consequently, students will be provided with the core skills in data collections and analysis that can be applied in an academic setting or work.
OBJECTIVES:
·         To provide students with options and different methods of data collection and analysis available in social research with specific emphasis on political research methodology.
·         To understand the philosophy and logic underlying social science research.
·         To appreciate the principles that guides the design and evaluation social science research.
·         To be confident in applying appropriate research methods to answer social and political issues.
Please Note:
The date and venue for Interim Assessment (30%) shall be determined during the semester.
Week No.
Date
Lecture Course
Tutorials
Venue
Assessment
1
30th and 31st  January 2017
Measurement in Research:
The types and nature of measurements.
Introduction

Lecture: JQB 14




2
6th and 7th February, 2017
Statement of the Problem in Research
Designing and defining a research question

Lecture:
JQB 14


3
13th and 14th February, 2017
Hypotheses
The significance and use of hypothesis in various research designs:
a.       Quantitative
b.      Qualitative
c.       Mixed Methods

Lecture: JQB 14


4
20th and 21st  February 2017
Theory
The significance and use of theory in various research designs:
a.       Quantitative
b.      Qualitative
c.       Mixed Methods
Types of theories
Levels of theory

Lecture: C JQB 14

5
27th  and 28th February, 2017
Literature Review- The Role in Research, Types

Lecture:  JQB 14

6
6th and 7th  March 2017
Literature Review- How to conduct review


Lecture: JQB 14

7
13th and 14th March 2017
Sampling and Samples- Types, importance and appropriate application

Lecture: JQB 14


8
20th and 21st   March, 2017
Methods of Data collections- Quantitative techniques-Surveys

Lecture:
JQB 14


9
27th and 28th March 2017
Methods of Data Collection- Quantitative techniques –questionnaire design

Lecture: JQB 14


10
3rd and 4th April, 2017
Methods of Data Collection- Qualitative techniques-observations

Lecture: JQB 14


11
10th  and 11th April, 2017
Methods of Data Collection- Qualitative techniques-Interviews-face to face and focus groups

Lecture:  JQB 14



12
17th and 18th April 2017
Methods of Data Analysis –Quantitative techniques

Lecture: JQB 14

13
24th and 25th  April, 2017
Methods of Data Analysis –Qualitative techniques

Lecture:  JQB 14

14
1st and 2nd    May 2017.
Revision
Revision
Lecture: JQB 14

14 - 16
Exam (70%)

KEY Reference Texts:
1.       Blaikie, Norman (2010).  Designing Social Research: The Logic of Anticipation. Second Edition.  Cambridge: Polity Press. pp. 124-147
2.       Creswell, J.W (2009).  Research Design: Qualitative, Quantitative and Mixed Methods Approaches. Third Edition.  London: Sage Publishing Inc. Chapter One: The Selection of Research Design pp 1-20
3.       Dawson, C (2011).  Introduction to Research Methods: A practical guide to anyone undertaking a research project.  Oxford: How To Books Ltd pp. 1-8
4.       Kreuger L. W and Lawrence Neuman, W (2003).  Social Work Research Methods: Qualitative and Quantitative Applications.  Boston: Pearson Education Inc. pp. 11-16 (Steps of the Research Process)
5.       Leedy, P.D and Ormrod, J. E. (2010).  Practical Research: Planning and Design. Ninth Edition.  New Jersey: Pearson Education Inc. pp: 1-7.
6.       May, T (2010).  Social Research: Issues, Methods and Process.  New York: Open University Press. Chapter One: Perspective on Social scientific research pp. 7-27.
7.       Punch, K.F (2005).  Introduction to Social Research: Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches.  Second Edition.  London: Sage Publications Ltd.   pp. 37-39
8.       Wolfer, L (2007).  Real Research: Conducting and Evaluating Research in the Social Sciences.  Boston: Pearson Education Inc.  pp 13-18.